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humansofnewyork:

“I hate conflict so much that I find myself agreeing with pretty much everything that everyone says.”

i didn’t know there would be some one who live half the globe across where i’m from and of different sex would suffer and enjoy such exact internal paradox

humansofnewyork:

“I hate conflict so much that I find myself agreeing with pretty much everything that everyone says.”

i didn’t know there would be some one who live half the globe across where i’m from and of different sex would suffer and enjoy such exact internal paradox

only if someday i could

only if someday i could

(Source: life1nmotion, via life1nmotion)

whlplash:

q’d


I’m sorryBut smoking boy with nice jaw line is simply too tempting

whlplash:

q’d

I’m sorry
But smoking boy with nice jaw line is simply too tempting

(Source: butportraiture, via -virtual)

floeme:

Adam | © | Floeme


So nice

floeme:

Adam | © | Floeme

So nice

(via life1nmotion)

(Source: 8bitsunset, via sadillite)

floeme:

Adam | © | Floeme

floeme:

Adam | © | Floeme

(via life1nmotion)

thephotographerssociety:

PHOTOGRAPHER FOCUS · Marco (LikeaPassion)

http://likeapassion74.tumblr.com/

Someone once defined photography as the way of fixing in time the vague blurred memory of what no longer exists. If everything flows, if there is nothing that is not subject to the laws of continuous change, as argued Buddhism and other philosophical approaches, it is clear that those previous instants to the act of pulling the shutter button of our camera are unique and only barely aprehensible if we make that photograph. If we don’t, it will all be changed in a snap -the light, the atmosphere … -  and then,  which captivated us at the time of seeing through our lens will be vanished, perhaps forever. And if you look calmly Marco’s photography you’ll be hopelessly affected by the  vivid feeling that it forms, in a way, a catalog of moments, a relation of fleeting  instants that the photographer has captured in time, in such a way that they will seem unrepeatable to us.

In Marco’s photographs there is more than an a mere interest, a taste, for landscape and its capture. You’ll also find a certain attempt to apprehend, to go beyond physical geography, the topography and the elements of the natural environment, to transcend to the field of human geography. Looking together all those photos taken at a particular location, for example in Kenya, you’ll have the inescapable feeling that they offer an experience that takes you not only to admire those that show its landscapes, its light and colors or its wildlife, but also all the other snapshots made ​​in that place where Marco glimpsed the life of its people, the eyes of children … They all form, ultimately, a set in which each one of these images seems to have its place: landscapes and portraits are well integrated into one unit, in an almost symbiotic relationship that you may establish or discover to understand the way the photographer’s eyes have beheld that place.

And it can be said that Marco also cultivates portrait  with great talent. In it, impresses me his great sense of the opportunity, the way in which Marco chooses exactly the time in which he must press the shutter and the form in which he penetrates inside of his model. Perhaps it is not alien to that the option of shooting in black and white, which I think is deliberate in these occasions, considering he works primarily in color. The Canadian photographer Ted Grant said that when you photograph people in color you photograph their clothes, but when you photograph people in black and white, you photograph their souls. And Marco seems to be sure about this maxim in his magnificent black and white portraits, characterized by a beautiful compositional simplicity and an appealing timelessness. And there is no evident preparation in them; it doesn’t seem that his portrayed are posing:  the spontaneity in these works is captivating.

From a technical point of view it may be said that color is an expressive element of first order in Marco’s photography. Watching his beautiful snapshots you will have no doubt that he loves the bright, saturated colors, which he make protrude through an intelligent use of light in them. Usually Its tones are intense and luminous, to the point where one can feel that such strong presence of color and the visual sensation that it produces in the viewer is at least, as important as the photographed object itself. But if this is characteristic of Marco’s landscape, it is no less important the way in which he delimits the fragments thereof he will present in each one of his shots. His framing is careful and refined. And he gets that  through both a wonderful sense of composition, as an intelligent and creative use of long focal lengths, which are direct means that he uses to fix the framing on the exact part of the landscape that he wants to capture. This is definitely one of the traits that most caught my attention in Marco’s photography, though it is absolutely undeniable that he applies with talent one of the most traditional rules of landscape photography, which is based on the utilization of the wide focal length as a way to strengthen the feeling of space in the scenarios. In photography there is nothing more orthodox than following the rules; and there is nothing more stimulating than exploring ways to break them with talent.

-Juan Manuel



Yellow

*76

thephotographerssociety:

oliabolotina:

Street gems

© Olia Bolotina

Excellent details with great colors, lighting, shadows and textures.

Yiannis

lest-at:

aros: Concrete pad showcases fascinating library design in…

lest-at:

aros: Concrete pad showcases fascinating library design in…

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WHO ARE THEY!!

WHO ARE THEY!!

(Source: attimiericordi, via kimbas-comprehension)